The Open Dentistry Journal




ISSN: 1874-2106 ― Volume 14, 2020

Predictor Model of Root Caries in Older Adults: Reporting of Evidence to the Translational Evidence Mechanism



Bauer JG1, *, Spackman S2, Dong J3, Garrett N4
1 UCLA School of Dentistry, Division of Restorative Dentistry, June and Paul Ehrlich Endowed Program in Geriatric Dentistry, 23-008E CHS, PO Box 951668, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, California 90095-1668, USA
2 UCLA School of Dentistry, Division of Restorative Dentistry, June and Paul Ehrlich Endowed Program in Geriatric Dentistry, USA
3 UCLA, Department of Biostatistics and Department of Human Genetics, USA
4 UCLA School of Dentistry, Division of Advanced Prosthodontics, Biomaterials, and Hospital Dentistry; Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology, USA

Abstract

Compared to younger adults, older adults are at greater risk for root caries. A model of root caries may assist dentists in predicting disease outcomes. OBJECTIVES: Using the Iowa 65+ Oral Health Survey, analysis was done to model the patterns of the root caries development in older adults.

Methods:

The statistical analysis included Markov chain modeling, model estimation and validation.

Results:

The model effectively predicts root caries using an 18-month predictive cycle and is validated up to 36 months (two cycles), with no significant differences (Chi-square test p-values >0.1) between predicted and observed distributions. However, we do not have observed data for validation beyond 36 months since the model was designed to perform only at single or multiple 18-month cycles. As expected, the predicted distribution at 54-month (3 cycles) and the observed distribution at 60-month differed significantly (p<0.0001).

Conclusions:

The model demonstrated a high probability that a sound surface will remain caries free. However, one and multiple-surface lesions aggressively infect adjoining surfaces. Maturing of the carious lesion occurs with the 4-surface lesion, decreasing the probability of tooth loss. Thus, maintaining a sound root surface and early treatment intervention reduces the risk of tooth dysfunction (morphological destruction) and loss.

DATABASE FILTERS:

P: Tooth/Subject characteristics-Older adults, 65 years of age or more, male and female participants, regional rural Iowa residents, race unspecified, functional status-non-institutionalized level unspecified, risk level unspecified

I: Root caries

P (C-not applicable): Probability/Statistical significance for decision data only/Clinical significance-dataset over 20 years old/Utility data not included/Cost data not included/Meaning in practice undetermined.

O: Each year through a three year cycle, caries progression from a sound root surface

A: Data attached:

■ Published manuscript

□ Unpublished manuscript

□ Raw data

R: Primary author contact information present



Article Information


Identifiers and Pagination:

Year: 2010
Volume: 4
First Page: 124
Last Page: 132
Publisher Id: TODENTJ-4-124
DOI: 10.2174/1874210601004010124

Article History:

Received Date: 9/9/2009
Revision Received Date: 14/10/2009
Acceptance Date: 14/10/2009
Electronic publication date: 16/7/2010
Collection year: 2010

© Bauer et al.; Licensee Bentham Open.

open-access license: This is an open access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.


* Address correspondence to this author at the UCLA School of Dentistry, Division of Restorative Dentistry, June and Paul Ehrlich Endowed Program in Geriatric Dentistry, 23-008E CHS, PO Box 951668, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, California 90095-1668, USA; Tel: 310-825-57747; Fax: 310-641-0523; E-mail: jbauer@dent.ucla.edu



Track Your Manuscript:


Endorsements



"Thank you for your magnificent and marvelous support throughout the publication stages. I would like to endorse my experience with you as a Junior Researcher and a recent graduate of the Dental school. Once again Thank you for your Great Help and Guidance throughout the stages of Publication. You guys are a great team and I am proud to be a Young Bentham author."


Asra Sabir Hussain
The University of Edinburgh Business School, UK

"My experience with Bentham Open was a valuable one because the quality of the services and analysis of my paper contributed in improving what we intended to convey to the readers."


José Ricardo Kina
Department of Surgery and Integrated Clinic,
Araçatuba School of Dentistry, São Paulo State University
Brazil

"The Publication Manager was very cooperative and replied my mails and guided me without any delays; however the reviewing process was too long."


Mahtab Memarpour
Prevention of Oral and Dental Disease Research Center,
Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry,
Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz,
Iran


Browse Contents



Webmaster Contact: info@benthamopen.net
Copyright © 2020 Bentham Open